WR 5

Homemade Wrinkle Releaser

I don’t like to iron. I sold my ironing board on Craigslist three or four years ago when I bought a steamer because I never used the ironing board. I bought a steamer because I used to work at a clothing department, was able to master using one without burning myself, and found it to be an easy and pretty fast way to get wrinkles out of a wide variety of fabrics without worrying about ruining them. Whenever I do laundry I fold what needs to be put in drawers, hang what needs to be hung up, and then move on with my day, telling myself that I will steam the clothes later. And then I forget. And then I do more laundry, and put off the steaming, and do more laundry, and put off the steaming – and everything eventually backs up.

As I was looking at the line of laundry to steam in my closet, I remembered seeing this awesome tip, and thought it would be worth a try. It is a recipe for homemade wrinkle releaser.

Here’s how you make it:

1 tsp. fabric softener and 1 cup water – mix it together in a spray bottle, and you are good to go!

Super easy. I actually doubled it because my water bottle was pretty large and I didn’t want to have to make it again too soon if it worked. And notice how shiny my Pyrex is? It still makes me smile. Back to the spray…

Take your finished product……

…….and find something wrinkly. Like this shirt:

You can see why this was in the steaming line. HAHA. Oh dear. Before you spray, check the label of your fabric softener to see if there are fabrics that you shouldn’t use it with (or check the label of your clothes). I just am paranoid about little stain drops on my clothes. I haven’t had any problems with it leaving stains at all, but I just thought I’d pass that on. When you’re sure your shirt is good to go, just give a good spray wherever there are wrinkles.

I still need to adjust my spray bottle, apparently, but you get the idea. After it is sprayed, you can either give it a good shake, or pull on the fabric a bit to start getting some of the wrinkles out. Then you hang it up and wait for it to dry. This is where you need to plan a little time in, unless you’re good with wearing something that is a bit damp. Or quite damp, like my lovely spray bottle got this shirt.

Here is the finished product:

Wow! That is definitely an improvement. It is ready to wear. Not perfect, but much better than before. I would say that the steamer really wouldn’t get it much better than this, and this is quick and easy. Spray. That’s it. Here is a close-up of a spot that still had some minor wrinkles:

I can live with that. I’ll probably still pull the steamer out for times that it really matters to have clothes that look nice and wrinkle-free, but honestly if you sit down or fold your arms wrong, you take a nice wrinkle-free outfit and give it some wrinkle love anyway. This is a good alternative when you don’t feel like taking the time to steam or iron, and have a long line of clothes ahead of you.

Happy spraying!

BB 4

The BEST Bakers

My five-year old will NOT eat potatoes. Except for french fries. But no mashed potatoes, no bakers, no breakfast potatoes, no potatoes in soup, no nothing. Until we found these bakers.  They. Are. Awesome! He is actually excited to have them, and will eat them skin and all.

Step 1: Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.

Step 2: Wash your bakers, and poke them all over with a knife. This allows the steam to escape from the bakers while they are in the oven.

Step 3: Put oil and kosher salt into small bowls. Take a small amount of oil (enough to lightly coat the potato), and rub it on the potato skin. Then take some kosher salt and rub it over the newly-oiled potato skin. This will be a little messy. We have tried both olive oil and vegetable oil, and have found we like vegetable oil best. Canola oil would be great too, I’m sure. Don’t worry about over-salting at this point – you can always brush salt off at the end – but you don’t need a ton of oil. You could use less than a teaspoon per potato and it would be enough. This helps keep your fat down to keep the oil down.

Here is what they will look like before you put them in the oven:

Step 4: Line a cookie sheet with tin foil and put on the bottom rack of your oven (this will keep the oven clean while the bakers are cooking). Place the potatoes on the top rack in the oven, and bake for 45 minutes. If you have more than four bakers, you may need to increase the time by up to 15 minutes. When they are no longer firm, they are done.

Step 5: Take out the potatoes (using tongs or oven mitts), and carefully brush off the extra salt – the bakers are hot! You just want to leave enough salt on to have tasty bakers, but not to make you sick. :)

Step 6: Cut open and marvel at the fluffy yumminess inside.

For the bit of extra time this takes, it is totally worth it. The skin is slightly crispy and delicious, the inside is perfectly cooked, and even potato-haters will be happy with it. Enjoy!

Hard-Boiled Eggs – Baked vs. MY way

Tonight we are going to dye our Easter eggs, which means that we need more hard-boiled eggs in our house. I already posted on an easy, no-frills way to make perfect hard-boiled eggs earlier this week, but saw an idea on Pinterest from The Burlap Bag that looked easy too – baking them. Since I needed to make a lot of eggs, I thought this would be the perfect time to test the two out together and see which one I liked better.

For the oven method: Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Put the eggs into the compartments of a muffin tin. Bake for 30 minutes.

As I was filling the remaining compartments up with water, I decided to fill one of the compartments with an egg in it with water as well to see if it changed the outcome.

Meanwhile: I boiled the water for my method. After it came to boiling, I put the eggs in. Since I knew for sure that my way would work, I did more of the eggs that way.

Worked again – not a single broken egg.

I started boiling the water when I put the other eggs in the oven. I finished with the stove-top eggs nine minutes before the oven ones were done. So, my way was faster, but the oven way is definitely easier: preheat, cook, forget about them until the timer is done.

Round 1 (cooking): My way – 4 points (faster, but more steps); Oven way – 5 points (slower, but one-step)

After cooking the eggs, I let them sit in a cold water bath. I’d check on the water every bit to make sure the water hadn’t warmed up. If it had, I just dumped out the warm water and filled it up again with cold water. When moving the eggs from the muffin tin to the water, tongs is the easiest way to go.

After they sat in the water, it was time to judge the appearance of the eggs. On the outside, they all looked the same. No spotting, just like normal eggs.

Then I peeled each of them to see how easy they were to peel, and judge how well they had cooked.

Yikes! The oven eggs were a little tougher to peel (some of the egg came off with the shell), and had some internal brown spotting. The oven way with the water inside actually browned more (but less concentrated), and some of the egg still came off with the shell. The other egg peeled fine, and looked normal.

Appearance: My way – 5 points (all looked normal); Oven way – 3 points (outside looked normal, inside had a couple of brown spots and some bits of egg peeled off as well as the shell)

Now came time to judge the internal appearance, texture and taste of the eggs. Here’s how they sliced up:

All three of the eggs had a similar, very nice texture. They were easy to slice through, and all well-cooked. The oven eggs both had a little grayish ring around the outside of their yolks, but it wasn’t bad. The stove egg had no ring.

Internal Appearance/Texture: My way – 5 points (perfect); Oven way – 4.5 points (slight docking for grayish ring)

As far as the taste was concerned, they all tasted pretty good. The oven-baked eggs seemed to have a more “eggy” taste to them (even in the whites), where the stove-top egg did not have that taste. If it hadn’t been for the contrast of the stove egg, I probably would not have thought much of it.

Taste Rating: My way – 5 points; Oven way – 4.5 points (slight docking for taste)

Overall Score: My way – 19 points; Oven way – 17 points

Depending on what you’re going for, either of these would be fine. If you need an egg to dye and don’t mind the brown spotting on the inside of the egg, the oven way is a bit easier and the finished egg still has a great texture, is fairly easy to peel, and tastes good. My way is an all-around good way to do the egg, takes slightly more work in the prep (carefully dropping the eggs in the water), but still gets done faster, and has a great texture, taste and appearance.

Happy Egging!

MyFitnessPal

My sister tipped me off to this website, and it is awesome.

It allows you to enter your weight, height, age, and weight goal. It then will give you the number of calories you should eat in each day to help you meet your goal.

I am pretty happy with my current weight, but I love the idea of knowing how much I am eating to know where I am at. It is also nice to have the accountability too. I have noticed myself consciously not eating something because I don’t want to enter it. Or not feeling guilty for eating one extra mini Hershey bar at the end of the day because I still had calories left to eat.

My sister started this in the middle of January, and has lost 11 pounds. She actually had to start eating more to lose weight (she is a nursing mother). Both of my parents are doing it as well, and have both lost weight. The recommended is a pound per week.

I started logging my food yesterday and was amazed at how many things could be found in the search function. Here is my log:

They even have off-brand foods listed, which is great. Also, notice the line with the red dot. Here’s a close-up:

The Lasagna Toss from last night – already programed in! I entered it in the search bar on a whim, and there it was. This seems to be VERY painless, compared to other sites I have seen.

Give it a try! Let me know if you try it, and how it works for you.

LT 6

Lasagna Toss

This is a recipe that I found from Kraft Foods back when they would send their magazine to you for free in the mail. It is one of my favorite lasagna recipes: not only is it tasty, but it is very easy. As in dump-a-bunch-of-stuff-into-a-pot easy.

Ingredients

1 lb. ground beef

1 jar spaghetti sauce (around 24 oz.)

1 2/3 c. water

1/4 c. Italian dressing

2 green peppers, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

12 oven-ready lasagna noodles, broken into pieces

1 c. Mozzarella cheese (or other, if desired)

 

Step 1: Brown the beef. Or, usually I will cook up a bunch of beef ahead of time and freeze it in baggies in one pound portions. Then I microwave to defrost and it makes dinner prep all that much faster.

Step 2: Add the spaghetti sauce, water, Italian dressing, green peppers and garlic. Bring to a boil. I actually typically leave out the green peppers out of personal preference, but added about a half of a green pepper this time because we had one in the fridge. The original recipe calls for 2 whole green peppers.

Step 3: Stir in the noodles and cover. Cook for 10-15 minutes on medium-low heat or until noodles are tender. Stirring occasionally.

Step 4: Remove from heat and add cheese to the top. Recover and allow cheese to melt, about 5 minutes. I used sharp cheddar cheese because that is what we had on hand; both are delicious. I also tend to use maybe 1/2 to 3/4 c. cheese instead. Again, personal preference. The original recipe calls for 1 cup.

Serve up and enjoy! This recipe is a family-pleaser. All three of my kids had seconds. Even my very picky 2-year old.

Happy Eatings!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...